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Aaron Lewis

December 13 @ 8:00 pm - 10:30 pm

MUST BE 21 OR OLDER TO ATTEND.

If it sounds like Aaron Lewis is long past defending his Country music pedigree, that would be a correct assessment. Lewis would prefer the music speak for itself and, with the release of SINNER, Lewis’ stunning Dot Records follow-up to his groundbreaking full-length solo debut The Road in 2012, any would-be detractors will be pretty much out of ammo.

Lewis, however, is not. SINNER blasts through today’s Country music doldrums like a shot of 100-proof whiskey, with the singer making zero compromises with either himself or the restrictions of a format that seems to have abandoned its rougher tendencies in favor of pop and ‘70s rock inclinations largely lacking in grit.

“I’d like to think that SINNER is a newer take on classic, traditional Outlaw Country, Waylon and Merle and Willie, and Hank Jr. and Johnny Cash and all that stuff,” says Lewis. “That was the music I heard as a kid, and that’s the Country music that permeated my soul and stuck with me my whole life.”

Lewis admits he “didn’t really pay attention to any of the Country music in between” that early Outlaw exposure and his emergence as a new voice for the genre with the release of “Country Boy” on the Town Line EP in 2011. “I was too busy going down the road of one day ending up being in a rock band, and revolting against the music I was basically force-fed as a kid,” he says. “I finally came around full circle, and this music crept back into my life. My plumber at the time bet me that I wouldn’t write a Country song, so I sat down and wrote ‘Country Boy,’ and the rest is history.”

As the front man for one of modern rock’s most successful bands in Staind, Lewis admits his entre into the Country world has been met with mixed reactions. “I have definitely dealt with some of the old guard questioning my commitment to the genre, questioning how much of this might be a toe-dipping in the water to see what the temperature is,” he says. “I had, and still have, a very established career in the rock world, and as much as that has been a blessing in some ways, it has been a curse in others in trying to be looked at as somebody who is taking this seriously and isn’t just trying to go where the money is. There has been a pretty big misconception I’ve had to battle, but there has also been lots of support. There have been times I’ve been told by a program director that my record was his favorite that came out that year but he couldn’t play it because it’s ‘too Country.’ The landscape of Country radio today doesn’t really leave any room for an artist like myself that has no desire to mix pop music with Country music. Why would I do that?”

Few pop-tinged songs would dare feature lyrics as candid, biting and personal as those on SINNER. If “Country Boy,” with it’s swaggering bravado, was the opening salvo, the 11 songs on SINNER herald a man who admits—and often deeply regrets—his personal shortcomings, yet offers no excuses. “This is an album of acknowledgement, admittance, moments of self-awareness,” he says. “It has been a pretty trying time in my life over the past few years, and these songs are what have come of it. At the risk of sounding cliché, my music has always been therapeutic for me.”

Produced by Country legend Buddy Cannon (whose production resume boasts masterpieces with artists ranging from Kenny Chesney and George Strait to Merle Haggard and George Jones), and recorded over 16 intense hours at Nashville’s Blackbird Studios, SINNER captures what was going on in Lewis’ head at this point in his life; laid back with a soundtrack that harkens back to the Country genre’s most honest and musically adventurous artists.

“I loved working with Buddy,” says Lewis. “He’s an amazing, highly accomplished producer that really doesn’t have very many bad ideas. And he also steps back and allows you to be creative and do whatever it is you’re doing, and doesn’t try to change the vision that you have. I was able to write and record a record that I was responsible for how it came out.”

Written on tour and during infrequent down times over the past two years, and road-tested in front of fans that basically served as judge and jury for inclusion on the record, the songs on SINNER together alternate between swagger and vulnerability, biting humor and fierce independence. Lewis and his creative compadre Ben Kitterman (Lewis’ former bus driver who earned a permanent place by his side on the road and in the studio once his talent was discovered), are joined by such A-Listers as Brent Mason (guitar), Paul Franklin (steel guitar), Jim “Moose” Brown (keyboards), Bobby Terry (guitar), Pat Buchanan (guitar) and Tony Creaseman (drums). Also taking part are such country stalwarts as Mickey Raphael, Willie Nelson (who adds a committed gravitas to the title cut), Alison Krauss, Dan Tyminski and Vince Gill. Remarkably, “I think I got Vince Gill to sing the word ‘shit’ for the first time in his career,” Lewis says with a laugh.

Most of the songs were cut live in the studio, using scratch vocals. “I had a pretty good idea what I wanted the album to sound like,” says Lewis, “and then it was a matter of just going in and either playing songs for the guys in the studio live on an acoustic guitar and let them go from there; or playing them YouTube clips of the song live off of somebody’s phone. Most of the time, they didn’t even need to listen to the whole song, they got the gist of it, charted it out, and then went in there and nailed it on one or two takes. Everything is live, everybody was just playing the song and going right to tape, and then 16 hours later the recording process was complete.”

The result is an album that is “as raw and as real and as un-messed with as it could possibly be,” according to Lewis, with the energy of a “band” record and an introspective tone that completely reflects the state of mind of Aaron Lewis. Creative flourishes abound, with innovative arrangements melding with traditional honky-tonk structures and instrumentations, along with muscular ballads and powerful themes of love, loyalty, alienation and regret, tempered by a dose of humor and knowing introspection.

While Lewis’ lyrics and vocals astound throughout, perhaps the most impactful song on an immensely interesting and entertaining album is its hidden track, a version of the Bruce Robison gem “Travelin’ Soldier” featuring vocals from Lewis then-13 year-old daughter, Zoe. In her recorded vocal debut, Zoe nails it, providing an innocence and purity of tone that serve the song’s lyrics to the highest level. It’s an auspicious debut, and one Lewis admits could change his daughter’s life.

“I am beyond proud,” says Lewis. “She has this innocence and purity to her voice because it’s a completely raw, untrained voice. All I was doing in the room, silently, with hand gestures and body motions, was just trying to get her to sing loud and project, just trying to get her to go after it.”

The power of Zoe’s debut begs the question of how Lewis would feel if his daughter were to embark on a career in a business he has been openly critical of. “I would be very, very cautious, and supportively against it, if that makes any sense,” he says. “It is a vicious, vicious industry, and I would have to be right there at her side, holding her hand the entire time in order to be comfortable with it. I’ve heard it all already, every possible thing you could throw at my daughter to influence her in some way, and it ain’t gonna happen.”

While SINNER may surprise those unaware of Lewis’ lyrical depth and vocal authority, hard-core fans of his concerts (which he describes as “a very healthy mix of cowboy hats, baseball caps, tattoos, black shirts”) will rejoice in having definitive copies of songs they’ve been hearing live and on the Internet, some for a couple of years.

Lyrically, Lewis generally doesn’t lead with his political views (though his stance is often to be found for those who look), he has been publicly outspoken in ways few Country artists dare in these complicated, polarizing times. “I believe in this country, I believe in the Constitution that created it, I believe in conservative capitalism, I believe in all the things that made this country great, and I will not shut up about that for anyone,” he states.

“And if you don’t like it, don’t talk politics with me, because I’m constitutionally correct in every single thing I say.”

As to whether his outspokenness has impacted his career, Lewis says, “It’s not hurting me as far as I know, but I couldn’t give a damn, I don’t care. And, honestly, I could care less if I lost a couple of people because of that along the way. If you can’t enjoy my music anymore because you don’t see eye-to-eye with me, then so be it. Whatever.”

And, after putting his heart and soul on the line to create SINNER, Lewis feels similarly about how it lands in the marketplace. “You can’t make everybody happy,” he says, “so you put your best foot forward, you hope everybody likes it, and if they don’t, f- ‘em.”

Details

Date:
December 13 @ 8:00 pm - 10:30 pm
Tickets:
BUY TICKETS
Anderson Dance Pavillion

Larsen Park Rd. on the riverfront. Reservations Call 712-279-6111. The Pavilion has a covered dance floor and raised bank area. The site of many summer events including Artsplash and The Big Parade. Enjoyed year-round, it is part of the extensive trail system running throughout the city.

Briar Cliff University

Offering a liberal arts education with solid career preparation, over 40 acres of study including pre-professional programs set in a beautiful, secure, hilltop campus.

Dorothy Pecaut Nature Center

Take I-29 Exit 151, 4 miles north on IA Hwy 12. or visit www.woodburyparks.com. This award-winning facility showcases the Loess Hills and provides opportunity for public recreation, education and stewardship. Classes, special events and meetings are held in the two 60-seat classrooms. The facility is handicap accessible. Three miles of hiking trails offer spectacular views and connect with other park trails. An outdoor amphitheater and 1/4 mile accessible trail also available. Open Tue-Sat 9-5; Sun 1-5. Closed Mondays.

Flight 232 Memorial

On the riverfront, near the Anderson Dance Pavilion. Commemorating the heroic rescue efforts shown by the Sioux City community after the crash of United Flight 232 in 1989, the statue depicts Colonel Dennis Nielson carrying a child to safety.

Fourth Street, Historic District

Historic 4th contains a concentration of late 19th century commercial buildings. Most of the larger buildings are notable for their distinctive Richardsonian Romanesque style of architecture popular to the late 1800’s. The area features antique and specialty shops, pubs and restaurants.

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Sioux City

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Sioux City is a fully integrated gaming resort offering over 835 slot machines and a wide variety of table games. The property also includes a 54-room Hard Rock Hotel, the world-famous Rock Shop, a live-entertainment venue, an outdoor event park, the World Tour Buffet, Main + Abbey restaurant, and multiple other food and beverage options. This one-of-a-kind site located in the historic downtown district delivers full throttle entertainment in every form!

IBP Ice Center

This 38,000sq.ft. facility features an 85′ x 200′ ice rink and 900 person seating capacity. It is open year-round for youth hockey programs, public ice skating, tournaments, figure skating and off-season inline skating and indoor soccer.

Call 712-279-4880 or 800-593-2228 for more information.

Public Ice Times:

Friday:       7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Saturday:  7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Admission:

$4 Adult  –  $1 Children 5 & Under

Skate Rental: $2

Skate Sharpening: $3

*Days and times subject to change

Lakeport Commons Shopping Center

Lakeport Commons offers convenient shops all in one location! Featuring retailers and restaurants such as Kohl’s, Old Navy, Olive Garden, Red Robin, Gap Outlet, PetSmart, and Michael’s Arts & Crafts.

Lamb Productions Theatre

For over 20 years LAMB productions have provided the highest-quality live theatre presentations including dramas, comedy and musicals, Running Sept – May. LAMB School of Theatre and Music offers a wide range of courses of babies through adults.

Latham Park

Located in a traditional, residential area of the Morningside section of Sioux City, Latham Park occupies almost a full acre of ground. Home to an endless variety of flowering plants and songbirds, and featuring a wonderful fountain and quiet sitting areas, Latham Park is used frequently for weddings, photo shoots, and bridal or baby showers.

LaunchPad Children's Museum

Opening in February 2016 in downtown, LaunchPad is an immersive learning environment for children ages
6 months to 10 years. Hands-on exhibits emphasize STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math)
principles and reflect the history and heritage of the Sioux City region.

Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center & the Betty Strong Encounter Center

Take exit 149 off I-29, Hamilton Blvd. Free admission. The center focuses on a day in the life of the explorers as they traveled through what is now the Sioux City area. History comes to life in exhibits that use dozens of interactive devices. A bookstore offers books and gifts for all ages. The grounds feature a 30×50 ft. U.S. flag, a 14ft. sculpture of Lewis, Clark and their dog, Seaman. Summer hrs: 9am-6pm daily. Winter hrs: 9-5 Tues- Sat., 1-5 pm Sum. Closed Mondays.

MidAmerica Museum of Aviation and Transportation

The museum opened in mid-2010 near the Sioux City Airport and Colonel Bud Day Field. The museum’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret and exhibit aviation and transportation history. The museum hours are as follows: Monday – Saturday 10 – 4 (closed on Wednesdays) and Sunday are 12 – 4 (April to September).  Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday only 10 – 4 (October to March). Click Here For Website

Morningside College

The mission of Morningside College, est. in 1894 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, is to cultivate a passion for life-long learning and dedication to ethical leadership and civic responsibility. Morningside sponsors numerous events, including concerts, lecture series, art exhibits and more- virtually open to the public. The 41 acre campus is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Municipal Band

The Municipal Band performs at the Grandview Park Bandshell, 24th and Grandview Sts.. The Band presents summer Sunday night concerts, and performs at various engagements throughout the year.

Orpheum Theatre

The spectacular renovated Orpheum Theatre is host to live theatre and symphony performances, movies, and national touring concerts and shows.

Promenade Cinema

On 4th Street, adjacent to Historic 4th Street and the Convention Center. The cinema features 14 screens, stadium seating and state of the art projection and sound. Concessions include more than the usual soda and popcorn.

Sergeant Floyd River Museum & Welcome Center

On the riverfront . Exit 149 from I-29, Hamilton Blvd. Board the M.V. Sergeant Floyd and begin a journey into the region’s maritime history. Built in 1932 as an inspection boat by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the Sergeant Floyd River Museum & Welcome Center chronicles the Missouri River’s development as a major shipping route and the key to Sioux City’s success in the early years of its founding. Discover exhibitions in the Lewis & Clark Expedition, the fur trade, Sioux City’s, evolution as a transportation hub and those rivercraft which still ply the waters of the Missouri river. The center provides travel planning for the tri-state region. The Galley Gift Shop features Sioux City souvenirs. Open daily 9am – 5pm.

Sioux City Art Center

Named “2002 Tourism Attraction of the Year” by the Iowa Division of Tourism and Travel, the Sioux City Art Center houses a three- story glass atrium and five galleries to showcase traveling and permanent collection exhibitions.

Sioux City Community Theater

Siouxland’s community theater with 8 main stage productions per season. Outstanding youth programming. Hours: Mon-Fri 1-5.

Sioux City Convention Center

The Sioux City Convention Center is the site of many events throughout the year from large conventions, to small meetings, to banquets and wedding receptions. It is also the site of popular public shows; sport and home shows, craft fairs and more.

Sioux City Explorers Baseball

Take I-29 to Singing Hills Blvd., exit , turn left onto Stadium Dr. Sioux City Explorers baseball has become a summertime tradition. In ten years, the Explorers have posted seven winning seasons, made three playoff trips and owned the best overall record in the league. They play 45 home games at the beautiful Lewis and Clark Park. Discounts for groups of 20 or more. , or visit

Sioux City Farmers Market

The Sioux City Farmers Market is available for 6 months out of the year, normally from May – October.  In 2015, the dates are May 6 – October 31.  The Farmers Market is open every Wednesday and Saturday from 8 am until 1 pm in the west parking lots of the Tyson Events Center, located at 401 Gordon Drive.  Off of I-29, take exits 148 or 149.

All products are grown, made, bred or manufactured by small businesses within a 100 mile radius of Sioux City. Products include locally raised fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs, bedding plants, fresh and dried flowers along with locally made breads, baked goods, pies, frozen and canned foods, roasted coffee, crafts, jewelry, clothing, wine and other surprises. Join us for a fresh-made breakfast, great entertainment, and friends.

 

Sioux City Musketeers Hockey

Mention hockey in siouxland and you’re talking about Sioux City Musketeers, one of the strongest franchises on the United States Hockey League since the developmental junior league was reorganized in 1980. Home games are played at the Tyson Events Center. Season and general ticket info available through the Musketeers office.

Sioux City Public Museum

Visit the spectacular new Sioux City Public Museum! The Museum preserves and shares the heritage of Sioux City through a variety of exhibitions, educational programs, and events. Open 10am-5pm Tuesday through Saturday, and 1pm-5pm on Sundays.

Sioux City Symphony Orchestra

Each year the symphony presents a 7-concert classical and pops series, a 3-concert family series, and a wide variety of educational programming throughout the region. The Sioux City Symphony Orchestra calls the historic Orpheum Theatre its home.

Sioux City Tourism Bureau

The Sioux City Tourism Bureau’s offices are located in the Sioux City Convention Center. Offering free information on Sioux City, area attractions, maps, and things to do, it’s also the location of the “Sioux City Store” which features local products such as Sue Bee Honey and Jolly Time Popcorn.

Southern Hills Mall

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With 110 specialty stores, Southern Hills Mall is anchored by Sears, Barnes & Noble, Younkers and Scheels All Sports. It features a dozen restaurants in the Cafe Court, and a 12-screen movie theater with stadium seating.

Stone State Park

This 1,400-acre state park, named for the Thomas Jefferson Stone family, is located on the western border of Iowa in the Plymouth and Woodbury counties. The rugged topography and panoramic views attract 200,000 people annually. The park is open year-round from 4 am-10:30 pm. The park roads are closed during the winter season. Cabins, camping, and lodge rental information available on the Park’s website, www.iowadnr.gov.

The Railroad Museum

Copy and paste this link http://www.milwaukeerailroadshops.org/

This complex was originally built in 1917 by the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railway Company, more commonly known as The Milwaukee Road. It was the 2nd largest shop complex in the Milwaukee’s system behind their home shops in Milwaukee, WI. The site originally encompassed over 50 acres of land and incorporated over 25 buildings to include a 30 stall roundhouse, machine/blacksmith shop, car/carpenter shop, steam power plant, water softener plant, stores warehouse, sand drying house and two wooden sand towers, a 300 ton capacity wood coal tower and more. The complex also included over 10 miles of track and employed over 500 people. The typical work accomplished at these shops is highlighted by an article from the Sioux City Journal providing a year end production report on the Milwaukee Railroad Shops for 1948.

Trinity Heights

The 33′ stainless steel statue of Jesus is the centerpiece of the Outdoor Cathedral. 53 acres offer a beautiful setting for the 30′ stainless steel statue of Mary, the Trinity gardens and Circle of Life memorial to the Unborn, the St. Joseph Center Museum features a life-size wood carving of the Last Supper. Grounds are open 9 am – 9 pm daily. The St. Joseph Center is open from 10 am until 8 pm Monday thru Saturday and 12 pm  -8 pm on Sunday.

And if you haven’t been to Trinity Heights in a while, the St Joseph Center has undergone a complete renovation in the last year and the life sized wood carving of the Last Supper by Jerry Traufler, has been re-stained and re-varnished and looks like new. It is truly non-denominational and is one of only 4 in the world! Located right here in Sioux City it is a treasure everyone should come to see. We have visitors from all over the United States and various countries around the world that come to see this amazing work of art.

Tyson Events Center / Gateway Arena

401 Gordon Dr. or visit .

The 10,000 seat events center is the home of the Sioux City Musketeers Hockey team, Sioux City Bandits Indoor Football team and also hosts many concerts, family productions and sporting events throughout the year. It hosts the NAIA Women’s Volleyball Championship in December, and the NAIA Division II Women’s Basketball Championship in March.

Woodbury County Courthouse

The courthouse, completed in 1917, is an example of Prairie School-style architecture. The building features stone carvings and elaborate windows.